More about Elves

He was always a bad acorn.

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A BAD ACORN

  In a land far away, in a very cold place, a place colder than your fridge, far colder than eating six ice-creams in snow or even colder still than sticking your tongue to an icy pole on winter’s day, is the Surprising Forest.

  In the Surprising Forest is tall oak tree after oak tree after oak tree after…you get the idea. And every Autumn the acorns fall to the ground to be picked up and stored by the Little Fluff Squirrels. Now, when Winter comes, the Little Fluff Squirrels hid away from the cold to protect their little toesies and spend their time snoring their heads off.

  And when spring comes, those same Little Fluff Squirrels finally get out of bed and go get something to eat. The Little Fluff Squirrels usually find most of the acorns they have stored away in their hidey places and goggle them up. The lazy, greedy pigs! But some acorns, just a few of the special emerald green acorns are forgotten. There they lie, waiting for the first full moon of Spring. And when it arrives, reflecting its majikal light onto the forest floor, little elves hatch out of the acorns like ugly chicks from eggs. But here’s the strangest thing: every single one of them is fully grown; a little man, with long beards and everything. This is true. I swear to you, no lie.

  But when the Bad Elf was born things were different. When his acorn fell, no Little Fluff Squirrels wanted to touch it – they hid from it! It lay there, in its bleak place, alone. Not a wonderful, emerald green colour but a dark, dark black. A black so dark that if you peered at it, you would feel like you were falling, down, down, down forever.

  So there it lay. Untouched. Waiting.

  Waiting for the moon to shine. And when it did shine, the acorn cracked open like knuckles and a dreadful smell oozed out of it, across the forest floor, turning any fallen leaves to dust and the forest to silence.

  Out rose the Bad Elf, a fully grown little man, with a long beard and eyes of flame. This was the beginning of Bob.

POEM: Darksiders

Moon above
Sellotaped wings
Plastic fangs
Night kings
Little witches
In a line
Waiting for the clock
To chime
Bobbing apples
In a bowl
A sweet treat
Is your goal
Pumpkins with
Toothy grins
Light the path
Of the twins
Black cats
Furry spiders
Tickle the faces
Of the darksiders

This poem was inspired by the annual Hallowe’en celebrations in my road. Watching my children and neighbour’s kids get dressed up in homemade costumes to go Trick Or Treating. One of my favourite times of year, ushering in Autumn and dark nights.

POEM: Summer sea & sand

Blue sea under blue sky

Sea
blue cerulean
crashing rushing swirling
deep expanse colour grains
slipping rolling sliding
warm butterscotch
sand

 

This type of poem is called a diamante. I thought I would try and write one myself as I like poems with clear structures. They can be fun to play with. It uses the following structure:

One noun (a)
2 adjectives (about a)
3 verbs (about a)2 nouns  (about a) + 2 nouns (about b)
3 verbs (about b)
2 adjectives (about b)
One noun (b)

So in above poem:

Sea
blue cerulean
crashing rushing swirling
deep expanse colour grains
slipping rolling sliding
warm butterscotch
sand

Why not try and write your own?

Write-30 No.45

Grecian statue inside library

The Secret Passage Way.

You visit an old library when on holiday. When looking around, you lean on a bookshelf. Suddenly, it moves to reveal a door to a secret passage way. Where does it go? What will you find?

STUCK?   Try this story starter:
Can you believe it? We were on holiday and my mother took us to a library! A library! Of all the boring places to go. Why not a water park or the beach or even a restaurant? But a library, I mean. I know she is a book fanatic but that was ridiculous. Anyway, I decided to wander around the place a bit as there was nothing else to do. There was row after row of tall bookcases that almost blocked out the light. They were filled with old leather bound books of various shades of black and brown. It was a like a book maze. So of course I got a bit lost and found myself in some dark corner by a wall of books trying to work out which way to go next. I leant against one of the shelves meaning to take a swig from my water bottle when I began to fall backwards. The shelf had moved. I turned around to look at what had happened and there was a door. A door made out of bookshelves.

What happens next?

What is Write – 30?
Write – 30 is a daily activity where you write non-stop for twenty minutes then check and edit your work for 10 minutes. You will be asked to write about different subjects and in different forms.

The writing should be done on lined paper in pencil if possible. Edit and check the work in pen. If you don’t have paper and pencil, use what you can. Even a computer.

Finding it difficult? What you can do to help:

  • Always sit/work in the same place
  • Always use the same writing tools
  • Always turn the TV off
  • No talking – it distracts thinking
  • Always listen to the same piece of classical music when writing.
  • Always set yourself a goal: count the number of words. Try to beat that number the following day.

Write-30 No. 36

Buildings on island

The Trip.

If you could go anywhere in the world where would you go? What would see there? What would you do? What would the food be like? 

STUCK?   Try this story starter:
If I could go anywhere in the world I would go to a small private island. It would be an island that…

What happens next?

What is Write – 30?
Write – 30 is a daily activity where you write non-stop for twenty minutes then check and edit your work for 10 minutes. You will be asked to write about different subjects and in different forms.

The writing should be done on lined paper in pencil if possible. Edit and check the work in pen. If you don’t have paper and pencil, use what you can. Even a computer.

Finding it difficult? What you can do to help:

  • Always sit/work in the same place
  • Always use the same writing tools
  • Always turn the TV off
  • No talking – it distracts thinking
  • Always listen to the same piece of classical music when writing.
  • Always set yourself a goal: count the number of words. Try to beat that number the following day.